Notices

 


NEWS RELEASE

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

November 28, 2018
Contact: Dan Ayres, (360) 249-4628

 WDFW approves four-day razor clam dig beginning Dec. 6

OLYMPIA – Razor clam diggers can return to various ocean beaches for a four-day opening beginning Dec. 6.

State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and evening low tides:

  • Dec. 6, Thursday, 6:01 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 7, Friday, 6:40 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 8, Saturday, 7:16 p.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 9, Sunday, 7:53 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results.

Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly in the fall when the best low tides come after dark, he added.

WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Dec. 20-23, pending results of future toxin tests. More information on planned digs can be found on WDFW’s razor clam webpage at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2018-19 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see https://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html.

Tentative dig dates 

Dec. 20, Thursday, 4:51 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Dec. 21, Friday, 5:35 p.m.; -1.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis

Dec. 22, Saturday, 6:20 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Dec. 23, Sunday, 7:05 p.m.; -1.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis


Tsunami Information:

Southwest Washington Tsunami Inundation Hazard Maps
Newly Published: Southwest Washington Tsunami Inundation Hazard Maps

Washington State DNR released new Tsunami Inundation Hazard Maps for Southwest Washington on Monday, March 26th, 2018. These maps are a bit different than previous tsunami inundation mapping. Previous inundation mapping was based upon the last Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake from 1700 AD. This new study and modeling is based upon a simulated 2500 year event, from a magnitude 9.0 earthquake. This event produces a farther reaching tsunami inundation scenario.
Although the 2500 year event brings more tsunami inundation, the response from all people along the coast is the same.
Once you feel the earthquake, DROP, COVER and HOLD ON until the ground shaking stops and then move to high ground immediately, whether it is a multi-story home, business, tower, or up a hillside. DO NOT attempt to run from the interior of a building during the earthquake as it increases your chances for injury. Always wait until the ground stops shaking. Remember, there WILL be aftershocks. DO NOT leave your place of safe haven unless someone in authority tells you it is ok to leave. You should stay in place for at least 2 full tidal cycles. (nearly 24 hours)

** Aftershocks may produce additional tsunami waves in coastal areas

The first tsunami waves (a minimum of 4 are expected) will arrive within 15-25 minutes following the quake.

Wave heights along the beaches will vary depending on the bathymetry of the coastline however the amount and level of inundation is our greatest concern. WA State DNR provided Grays Harbor Emergency Management some approximate inundation depths for this 2500 year event for our coastal areas.
Ocean City:
Screamin’ Eagle Campground: 45.1 ft.
Ocean Shores:
Spinnaker Park: 28.5 ft.
Bill’s Spitt (Peninsula Ct SE): 4.7 ft.
Elks Lodge: 21.1 ft.
Point Brown Ave at E Chance a La Mer NE roundabout: 27.2 ft.
Westport:
Westport Viewing Tower: 12.5 ft.
W Ocean Ave roundabout: 18.4 ft.
Westport City Park: 6.5 ft.
Grayland:
Beachcomber Grocery and Deli: 26.2 ft.
Security State Bank: 22.2 ft.
Areas of deepest on-land inundation
North Jetty (Ocean Shores): 67 ft.
Damon Point (Ocean Shores): 61 ft.
Ocean City: 57 ft.

POINTS TO REMEMBER
This is a model of a predicted event. There is a possible difference of +/- 30% to 40%, of the values in this study. Mankind has never been able to predict the timing of an occurrence, size of the earthquake or devastation caused by an earthquake and the possible resulting tsunami.
The modeling takes into account mean high tide and subsidence (4-6 feet). If we are at low tide when the tsunami arrive, the event will have a reduced impact, however, if we are at higher tides (King Tides, Higher Astronomical Tides), the event could have a greater impact.
For a large earthquake and tsunami event, such as this modeled event, there is the possibility of PREQUAKES, the main 9.0 Earthquake and hundreds of AFTERSHOCKS, some potentially capable of producing additional tsunami waves.
Your actions are exactly the same for any felt earthquake along the coast – MOVE TO HIGHER GROUND! The earthquake DOES NOT have to reach a magnitude 9.0 to produce a tsunami.